The barbary plague the black death in victorian san francisco

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the barbary plague the black death in victorian san francisco

The Barbary Plague: The Black Death in Victorian San Francisco by Marilyn Chase

The veteran Wall Street Journal science reporter Marilyn Chase’s fascinating account of an outbreak of bubonic plague in late Victorian San Francisco is a real-life thriller that resonates in today’s headlines. The Barbary Plague transports us to the Gold Rush boomtown in 1900, at the end of the city’s Gilded Age. With a deep understanding of the effects on public health of politics, race, and geography, Chase shows how one city triumphed over perhaps the most frightening and deadly of all scourges.
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Published 08.09.2019

May 27, 1907: Bubonic Plague Hits San Francisco, Again!

The Barbary Plague

The Barbary Plague: The Black Death in Victorian San Francisco by Marilyn Chase 1 belongs to that genre of books that provide a broad social, cultural, and historical context for epidemiologic issues. The Barbary Plague chronicles the bubonic plague epidemics of — and — in San Francisco. It is the story of a deadly epidemic, the application of new science, political chicanery, blatant racism, judicial involvement, personal heroism, indefatigable perseverance, and the triumph of good over evil. Four men dominate the saga: Joseph J. Its ethnic diversity, social stratification, and physical beauty are thoroughly described to provide the setting in which the first plague death occurred in a Chinese workman on March 6,

The Barbary Plague and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. The Barbary Plague: The Black Death in Victorian San Francisco Paperback – March 9, The veteran "Wall Street Journal science reporter Marilyn Chase's fascinating account of an outbreak of bubonic.
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The Black Death in Victorian San Francisco

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In , a ship called the Australia docked in San Francisco, carrying infected rats that launched a plague epidemic in the city, which raged sporadically for five years before it was subdued. Chase, a reporter for the Wall Street Journal , argues in this engaging narrative that social, cultural and psychological issues prevented public health officials from curtailing the outbreak. Relying on published sources, diaries and letters, Chase shows how the disease first hit Chinatown and explains that most San Franciscans denied the outbreak, while others blamed the city's Chinese population city officials hid behind worries about tourism and the city's reputation. But Chase goes beyond sociological analysis in this lively work and focuses on the players. While the first public health official assigned to stem the epidemic, Joseph Kinyoun, was an innovative scientist, Chase shows how he lacked the strategy and tact necessary for the task—his plan to quarantine Chinatown caused as many problems as it solved. Only when Rupert Blue, a new official, was assigned to the case after a second outbreak five years later, was the epidemic quashed.

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