Was the confederacy a nation

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was the confederacy a nation

A Shattered Nation: The Rise and Fall of the Confederacy, 1861-1868 by Anne Sarah Rubin

Historians often assert that Confederate nationalism had its origins in pre-Civil War sectional conflict with the North, reached its apex at the start of the war, and then dropped off quickly after the end of hostilities. Anne Sarah Rubin argues instead that white Southerners did not actually begin to formulate a national identity until it became evident that the Confederacy was destined to fight a lengthy war against the Union. She also demonstrates that an attachment to a symbolic or sentimental Confederacy existed independent of the political Confederacy and was therefore able to persist well after the collapse of the Confederate state. White Southerners redefined symbols and figures of the failed state as emotional touchstones and political rallying points in the struggle to retain local (and racial) control, even as former Confederates took the loyalty oath and applied for pardons in droves.

Exploring the creation, maintenance, and transformation of Confederate identity during the tumultuous years of the Civil War and Reconstruction, Rubin sheds new light on the ways in which Confederates felt connected to their national creation and provides a provocative example of what happens when a nation disintegrates and leaves its people behind to forge a new identity.

Historians often assert that Confederate nationalism had its origins in pre-Civil War sectional conflict with the North, reached its apex at the start of the war, and then dropped off quickly after the end of hostilities. Anne Sarah Rubin argues instead that white Southerners did not actually begin to formulate a national identity until it became evident that the Confederacy was destined to fight a lengthy war against the Union. She also demonstrates that an attachment to a symbolic or sentimental Confederacy existed independent of the political Confederacy and was therefore able to persist well after the collapse of the Confederate state. White Southerners redefined symbols and figures of the failed state as emotional touchstones and political rallying points in the struggle to retain local (and racial) control, Rubin argues, even as former Confederates took the loyalty oath and applied for pardons in droves.
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The CSA Never was a 'Lost cause' A New Southern Nation was Born

We Legitimize the ‘So-Called’ Confederacy With Our Vocabulary, and That’s a Problem

Confederate States of America , also called Confederacy , in the American Civil War , the government of 11 Southern states that seceded from the Union in —61, carrying on all the affairs of a separate government and conducting a major war until defeated in the spring of Convinced that their way of life, based on slavery , was irretrievably threatened by the election of Pres. When the war began with the firing on Fort Sumter April 12, , they were joined by four states of the upper South Arkansas, North Carolina , Tennessee , and Virginia. A provisional government, established in February at Montgomery , Alabama , was replaced by a permanent government at Richmond , Virginia , a year later. The Confederacy, operating under a structure similar to that of the United States , was headed by Pres. Jefferson Davis and Vice Pres. Alexander H.

The Confederate States of America was a collection of 11 states that seceded from the United States in following the election of President Abraham Lincoln. Led by Jefferson Davis and existing from to , the Confederacy struggled for legitimacy and was never recognized as a sovereign nation. After suffering a crushing defeat in the Civil War, the Confederate States of America ceased to exist. The southern and northern United States began to pull apart in the 19th century, culturally and economically, with slavery at the center of the rift. As early as , South Carolina and Mississippi called for secession. The election of Abraham Lincoln was labeled an act of war by some Southern politicians, who predicted armies would come to seize slaves and force white women to marry black men. Secession meetings and assemblies started to appear across the South.

The Confederate States of America (CSA or C.S.) — commonly referred to as the Confederacy . The Confederacy has been considered a spiritual predecessor to nations such as Nazi Germany and apartheid South Africa by many historians.
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One of the most important victories won by the United States during the Civil War was not ever fought on a battlefield. Rather, it was a series of diplomatic victories that ensured that the Confederacy would fail to achieve diplomatic recognition by even a single foreign government., It is also called the Southern Confederacy and refers to 11 states that renounced their existing agreement with others of the United States in — and attempted to establish a new nation in which the authority of the central government would be strictly limited and the institution of slavery would be protected. Secession from the existing Union led to the American Civil War, a bloody, four-year struggle that left much of the South in ashes and ended its hope of creating a new confederacy of states on the North American continent.

We have not a doubt that his heart throbs as earnestly as any man's for the national prosperity and glory. Nobody would feel more wronged in being called a Secessionist. Yet were we to judge him by his recent speech in the House on the Confiscation Bill, we could not possibly avoid the conclusion that he is a Secessionist; and, what is more, that he acknowledges the independence of "the Confederacy" -- the very thing which our Government has declared it would make a casus belli against England and France, if done by them. STEVENS aims to show that we have a right to impose a universal confiscation of the South; that is to say, that we have a right to take the entire property of every Southern man, whether he be at heart loyal or disloyal. He don't commit himself positively to the expediency of it, but the naked right he maintains without qualification He bases his argument upon the proposition. When an insurrection becomes sufficiently formidable to entitle the party to belligerent rights, it places the contending Powers on precisely the same footing as foreign nations at war with each other.

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3 thoughts on “A Shattered Nation: The Rise and Fall of the Confederacy, 1861-1868 by Anne Sarah Rubin

  1. As the debate escalates over how we publicly remember the Civil War following the tragic events in Charlottesville, Virginia, the passionate and contentious disputes have centered on symbols like monuments, street names and flags.

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