Frederick douglass 4th of july speech analysis

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frederick douglass 4th of july speech analysis

Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July by James A. Colaiaco

On July 5th, 1852, Frederick Douglass, one of the greatest orators of all time, delivered what was arguably the centurys most powerful abolition speech. At a time of year where American freedom is celebrated across the nation, Douglass eloquently summoned the country to resolve the contradiction between slavery and the founding principles of our country. In this book, James A. Colaiaco vividly recreates the turbulent historical context of Douglass speech and delivers a colorful portrait of the country in the turbulent years leading to the civil war. This book provides a fascinating new perspective on a critical time in American history.
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Frederick Douglass: The Meaning of July 4th for the Negro

For those who feel that way, July 5 may be an easier day to celebrate: on that day in , 4, African Americans paraded down Broadway in New York City to celebrate the end of slavery in their state. One person who felt that way was Douglass, the famous abolitionist, who was himself born into slavery.
James A. Colaiaco

The Hypocrisy of American Slavery (1852)

Worried about plagiarism? Read this. Help Login Sign Up. In his speech, What to the Slave is the Fourth of July? Douglas uses many rhetorical strategies to convey his powerful emotions on the subject, and the end result is a very effectively argued point.

Many copies of one section of it, beginning in para. While referring to the celebrations of the American Independence day the day before, the speech explores the constitutional and values-based arguments against the Slave trade within the United States. As well, Douglass referred not only to the captivity of enslaved people, but to their merciless exploitation and the cruelty and torture to which they were subjected while enslaved. Heath and D. Waymer called this topic the "paradox of the positive" because it highlights how something positive and meant to be positive can also exclude individuals. Douglass compares the treatment of slaves to that of American colonists under British rule and urges them to help the slaves like they helped themselves when breaking free. What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence?

by Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass was a fiery orator and his speeches were often published in various abolitionist newspapers. Among his well-known speeches is "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro," presented in Rochester, New York, on July 5, , a version of which he published as a booklet. - Introduction Behind Frederick Douglass ' context, Douglass was a former slave who became one of the most successful abolitionist of the 19th century. With his oratorical appeals, in , Douglass delivered a speech that changed the views of millions over the Fourth of July.

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3 thoughts on “Frederick Douglass and the Fourth of July by James A. Colaiaco

  1. Frederick Douglass's, “What To the Slave Is the Fourth of July?” | NEH-Edsitement

  2. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave. Critical Essays The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro. Frederick Douglass was a fiery orator and his speeches were often published in various abolitionist newspapers.

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