Art and geometry a study in space intuitions

9.18  ·  2,806 ratings  ·  689 reviews
Posted on by
art and geometry a study in space intuitions

Art and Geometry: A Study in Space Intuitions by William Ivins Jr.

One of Western civilizations jealously guarded myths is that of Greek cultural supremacy. In this controversial study, William Ivins shows that the limitations of the Greek worldview actually hampered the development of the arts and sciences and gives a stimulating history of the new ideas of the Renaissance, especially in painting and geometry, that freed us from ancient misconceptions. Beginning with the Greeks, the author explains for the general reader the differences between ancient and Renaissance painting and sculpture, proving that the curiously static quality of Greek art arose from a misunderstanding of the laws of perspective. He then shows how this misunderstanding was corrected by Alberti, Pelerin, Durer, and other Renaissance artists who provided the first fruitful investigations of perspective. From there to projective geometry was but a step, and the author covers this major advance in our knowledge through the work of Nicholas of Cusa, Kepler, and Desargues. This book is perhaps the only concise history in English of the development of mathematical perspective and projective geometry. But the authors ability to relate styles in art to advances in geometry and his ingenious theory of the modern visual worldview and the Greek tactile worldview mean that his book will be provocative not only to mathematical historians but also to art historians and to anyone concerned with the history of thought, from philosopher to layman.
File Name: art and geometry a study in space intuitions.zip
Size: 82734 Kb
Published 24.12.2018

How To Draw Spirograph Pattern Art In Triangle - Geometric Tutorial

Art and Geometry: A Study in Space Intuitions (Dover Books on Art History S) Paperback – October 5, One of Western civilization's jealously guarded myths is that of Greek cultural supremacy. In this controversial study, William Ivins shows that the limitations of the Greek.
William Ivins Jr.

art and geometry a study in space intuitions.pdf

My adventure began with some simple homemade experiments with my hands and eyes as the respective organs of the tactile-muscular and visual intuitions. Obvious and unexciting as their results may appear to be, their implications are of remarkable interest. Unless the eye moves rather quickly, it is conscious of no breaks in the continuity of its awarenesses, although, of course, as seeing is a selective volitional activity, such breaks are many and great. Things emerge into full consciousness very gradually as they come into the field of vision. If, while looking straight ahead, we hold a hand out at full arm's length sideways behind the line of the two shoulders, we cannot see it nor are we visually aware of it.

William M. One of Western civilization's jealously guarded myths is that of Greek cultural supremacy. In this controversial study, William Ivins shows that the limitations of the Greek worldview actually hampered the development of the arts and sciences and gives a stimulating history of the new ideas of the Renaissance, especially in painting and geometry, that freed us from ancient misconceptions. Beginning with the Greeks, the author explains for the general reader the differences between ancient and Renaissance painting and sculpture, proving that the curiously static quality of Greek art arose from a misunderstanding of the laws of perspective. He then shows how this misunderstanding was corrected by Alberti, Pelerin, Durer, and other Renaissance artists who provided the first fruitful investigations of perspective. From there to projective geometry was but a step, and the author covers this major advance in our knowledge through the work of Nicholas of Cusa, Kepler, and Desargues.

About HUP eBooks. Harvard University Press has partnered with De Gruyter to make available for sale worldwide virtually all in-copyright HUP books that had become unavailable since their original publication. Ivins bases his stimulating and readable study on the antithesis between Greek and Western conceptions of space.
columbia university go ask alice

Description:

Updating results WorldCat is the world's largest library catalog, helping you find library materials online. Don't have an account? Your Web browser is not enabled for JavaScript. Some features of WorldCat will not be available. Create lists, bibliographies and reviews: or.

Publisher: Dover Publications Inc. Please sign in to write a review. If you have changed your email address then contact us and we will update your details. We have recently updated our Privacy Policy. The site uses cookies to offer you a better experience.

One of Western civilization's jealously guarded myths is that of Greek cultural supremacy. In this controversial study, William Ivins shows that the limitations of the Greek worldview actually hampered the development of the arts and sciences and gives a stimulating history of the new ideas of the Renaissance, especially in painting and geometry, that freed us from ancient misconceptions. Beginning with the Greeks, the author explains for the general reader the differences between ancient and Renaissance painting and sculpture, proving that the curiously static quality of Greek art arose from a misunderstanding of the laws of perspective. He then shows how this misunderstanding was corrected by Alberti, Pelerin, Durer, and other Renaissance artists who provided the first fruitful investigations of perspective. From there to projective geometry was but a step, and the author covers this major advance in our knowledge through the work of Nicholas of Cusa, Kepler, and Desargues. This book is perhaps the only concise history in English of the development of mathematical perspective and projective geometry.

0 thoughts on “Art and Geometry: A Study in Space Intuitions by William Ivins Jr.

Leave a Reply