Stephen covey indian talking stick

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stephen covey indian talking stick

The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness by Stephen R. Covey

Why I Read this Book: There are few things more important to success than having a clear vision of what you want to accomplish. This book provided me with the fundamentals necessary for putting that vision together and helping others to do the same.

Review:

Stephen Covey came right over the top with this one. It’s funny to write one book about 7 habits and haveit be around 250 pages and then write another book about the 8th habit alone and have it be over 400. The truth is that every one of those pages was very well used. This book was fantastically written and is an absolute must read for people serious about continued personal (and professional) development and enrichment. I know it seems like I have similar extremely positive things to say about many of these books, but please keep in mind that that is why they are on this site. These are the best and most valuable books that I have read. The reason there are not negative reviews on this site is because I am only cherry picking what I feel is most important and beneficial to you as the reader and your success. I have found every one of the books on this site to be very beneficial.

The 8th Habit is to find your voice and inspire others to find theirs. I would put it in the top four most valuable books (that I have read) on personal development and enrichment. It is right up there with The 7 Habits by Stephen Covey, Unlimited Power by Tony Robbins, and How To Win Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie. If you have not read these reviews and books, I suggest you do so now. They contain the most universal and valuable words you may come across in your journey for success. They provide the framework from which everything else diverges.

Much of Covey’s words in the 8th Habit stem from the idea of taking the road less traveled by, which is something that you should all know by now is very near and dear to me. If you are not familiar with this poem by Robert Frost, please read it here. One and all should take the road less traveled in some way or another because no one has the same vision and plan for their life, therefore everyone’s road should be one that others have not traveled. If you aren’t taking this road then you are most likely trying to live someone else’s dream.

The single most valuable takeaway from this book is the companion website that comes with it. You can visit it at www.8thhabit.com. This site is offered free of charge to those of us who have purchased the book. It is only of great use if you use it as a tool as you read through the book. Throughout the book Covey refers the reader to various films and exercises to further his points. Two of these videos are the most inspirational I have seen. I watch them first thing each morning before I set out to work towards my goals. Once you see them you will understand why. To see the videos visit www.8thhabit.com/offers, but please only do so if you have purchased the book. The two I am referring to are entitled Legacy and The Nature of Leadership. They are very inspiring.

Through finding your voice he shows the power it can have on your leadership style and working with others. Leadership is giving people the vision and drive to complete a goal. The problem with most organizations is that they are under-led and over-managed. Remember that things are managed and controlled, but people are led and empowered. It is a common misconception that there are only a few people in this world who are the leaders and the rest are to be led.

When you think about it, leadership is more of a state of mind than anything else. You should always be leading others while also being led. At any point in your life you have the power to be a leader; to take initiative. If nothing else, you are the leader of your own life. Could you think of a more important role or position than being the leader of you and your destiny? It really does not get any more executive than that. What Covey really wants us to understand is you must always remember that it is you who has the power to control your life and your circumstances, but you must also always remember that others have this same power over themselves as well. That is the whole idea of finding your voice and inspiring others to find theirs. It is here where you find greatness.

I will end with a point Covey makes that resonates with me more than most. This is something that has become one of my best practices (you know, something that you try to do as often as possible as you live your life). It is, “Always try to operate outside of your comfort zone.” It is so easy to be overcome by comfort and it can be the most infectious object for your success. Don’t get me wrong, it is very difficult to get yourself to operate outside of this zone. So few people do it, and its where all real achievement occurs. It is the reason why so many people’s dreams remain just that. It is why so few people read books like the 8th Habit and others listed on this site. Do something great for yourself today and get out of your comfort zone. Give the 8th Habit a read and you will get that first nudge. It may be all you need.

-Reading For Your Success
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Published 17.12.2018

Traditional Communication Tool: The Talking Stick

indian talking stick stephen covey

One of the tools use to help people effectively negotiate a difficult conversation is known as the Indian Talking Stick. Stephen Covey describes the Indian Talking stick as one of the most powerful communication tools he has used. Stemming from American Indian culture it has been used for centuries to build understanding and resolve differences respectfully and effectively. The idea is that only the person holding the stick gets to make their point and they continue to speak on this point until they feel they have been understood. The other person s are only permitted to speak in so far as they need to clarify or reflect back in order to demonstrate that they have understood the speaker. So a couple of weeks ago, in the middle of an escalating argument during a long car journey I decided to try this with my two daughters and myself I was party to the argument too!

A long time ago, a former boss gave me some sound advice: Seek first to understand, Then to be understood. Do you recognize it? I love the whole purpose of this phrase. To understand and to be understood. And what better mission for any internal communicator? So why does this happen?

Covey Menu. It helps to have the practical tools that enable you to achieve results. The talking stick has been used for centuries by many Indian tribes as a means of just and impartial hearing. One of the tools use to help people effectively negotiate a difficult conversation is known as the Indian Talking Stick. Stephen Covey describes the Indian Talking stick as one of the most powerful communication tools he has used. Stemming from American Indian culture it has been used for centuries to. Stephen Covey explains the power of listening for understanding in his story about the Indian Talking Stick.

Highly effective people are great listeners and great communicators. Stephen Covey Quotes. Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply. They're either speaking or preparing to speak. They're filtering everything through their own paradigms, reading their autobiography into other people's lives. Be a light, not a judge. Be a model, not a critic.

4 thoughts on “The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness by Stephen R. Covey

  1. Stemming from American Indian culture, it has been used for centuries to build understanding and resolve differences respectfully and effectively.

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