Ride a cockhorse to banbury cross words

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ride a cockhorse to banbury cross words

Ride a Cock Horse by Gayl Taylor

Musician Hunter Blake returns to Banbury Cross to win back his true love, Kate. Will they find a way to make beautiful music again? Not even a cock horse could bring musician Hunter Blake back to Banbury Cross, yet here he stood, ten years after leaving, to make amends for his past behavior and win back his true love, Katherine Banbury. Their relationship was in perfect harmony until Hunters excessive drinking tore them apart. Now sober, hes focused on doing whatever it takes to prove hes worthy of her love. Kate spent the last ten years determined to forget Hunter. With a developer intent on turning her ancestral home into tract housing, Kate had her hands full. When Hunter returns, vivid memories of their passionate history stoke the flames of desire between them. Will Kate fight the attraction or will she open her heart to love once more?
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Published 15.12.2018

♬Ride A Cock-Horse To Banbury Cross【Nursery Rhyme, Kids Song for Children】

What is a cock horse and where is Banbury?

The words 'With rings on her fingers' obviously relates to the fine jewellery which would be worn by a Queen. The words 'And bells on her toes' refer to the fashion of attaching bells to the end of the pointed toes of each shoe - this fashion actually originates from the Plantagenet era of English history but was associated with the nobility for some time! Banbury was situated at the top of a steep hill and in order to help carriages up the steep incline a white cock horse a large stallion was made available by the town's council to help with this task. When the Queen's carriage attempted to go up the hill a wheel broke and the Queen chose to mount the cock horse and ride to the Banbury cross. The people of the town had decorated the cock horse with ribbons and bells and provided minstrels to accompany her - "she shall have music wherever she goes". The massive stone cross at Banbury was unfortunately later destroyed by anti - Catholics who opposed the notion of pilgrimages.

The original meaning is unknown and may simply be a nonsense rhyme. If we are to find the origin of 'ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross' it will be helpful to look at the nursery rhyme that the line comes from. The best known version of that rhyme is:. Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross, To see a fine lady upon [or 'ride on'] a white horse; Rings on her fingers and bells on her toes, And she shall have music wherever she goes. Clearly we'll need to find out what a 'cock-horse' and Banbury Cross are. The second part is the easiest - Banbury Cross is a cross in the English town of Banbury - that could hardly be simpler.

It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross, To see a fine lady upon a white horse; Rings on her fingers and bells on her toes, And she shall have music wherever she goes. Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross, To buy little Johnny a galloping horse; It trots behind and it ambles before, And Johnny shall ride till he can ride no more. The modern rhyme is the best known of a number of verses beginning with the line "Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross", some of which are recorded earlier. A reference in to 'Now on Cock-horse does he ride' may allude to this or the more famous rhyme, and is the earliest indication we have that they existed. A ring on her finger, A bonnet of straw, The strangest old woman That ever you saw. The instability of the early recorded lyrics has not prevented considerable speculation about the meaning of the rhyme.

What's the meaning of the phrase 'Ride a cock-horse to Banbury Cross'?

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5 thoughts on “Ride a Cock Horse by Gayl Taylor

  1. "Ride a cock horse to Banbury Cross" is an English language nursery rhyme connected with the English town Banbury. It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of.

  2. A cock-horse is anything a kid rides on and pretends is a horse like someone's lap, a rocking horse or a long wooden stick with a toy horse's head on top.

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